Feltman’s response to Al Akhbar

Former US ambassador in Lebanon Jeffrey Feltman responded in the NY Times today to the allegations made in a previous article in the same newspaper on Al Akhbar about waking up every morning and getting upset after reading  Al Akhbar.

Feltman answered! There is something quite desperate in this act. Check the argument: Actually, Al Akhbar is not that heroic because it does not criticize Hizbullah’s SG Nasrallah just like Syrian Tishreen will never criticize Bashar al Assad.

Apart from the fact that no one talked of heroism, well, there is a tiny detail here: Al Akhbar is not owned by Hizbullah, and actually does criticize Hizbullah virultently. Check for example the corruption case of Salah Ezzedine. Needless to say that this point was made in the original NYT article, so what is Feltman babbling about. Does he want attention?

Does it occur to Feltman that defending or supporting Nasrallah may come from a conviction (heroic if he likes this word) that the guy is a leader to be respected, and that this probably reflects a large chunk of the Lebanese population and beyond?

From then on, Feltman’s answer loses all sense of logic and becomes plain stereotyping. Feltman confuses Western journalists, with Al Akhbar ones, lifestyle like drinking wine with political choice of supporting the resistance. This dimension is not even worth it to be explored, it has been done countless times on this blog.

And what did you know about Samir Kassir and Gebran Tueni? Just because they got killed makes them heroic? Is this how you guys work? Now that they are useless as such and can’t do much except through the way their image is being manipulated by your media, yes, they become heroic…

Besides, Feltman forgets that journalists of Al Akhbar and other press outlets as well as TV stations were killed by Israeli fire? Are these considered more or less heroic act? I guess it depends who kills or on which arena you fall.

But above all as I was saying, Feltman’s answer sounds like someone’s desperate for attention. One could hear him shout: “no, someone hear me, I am that ambassador they’re talking about, and I did not have a belly ache, they aren’t so impressive believe me!” Well, someone is angry because he was not ‘received’!

American ambassadors, they come here, don’t understand anything about the politics of the place (except through the specific ideology their administration feeds them to implement). Then they leave, still ignorant, imbued by the stereotypes they could gather from this or that dinner they had the chance to go to, wondering why their projects did not work.

Update: For a more elaborate answer, just found Angry Arab’s.

This entry was posted in Hizbullah, Lebanon, Media, US Diplomacy, US Foreign Policy. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Feltman’s response to Al Akhbar

  1. Princesse de Clèves, islamogauchiste says:

    In addition to headaches and morning belly laughs, the reading of al Akhbar has another effect on Jeffrey Feltman.
    It provokes serious memory lapses :

    http://en.rsf.org/liban-lebanese-journalist-killed-when-03-08-2010,38093.html

    “Assaf Abu Rahal, a journalist working for the daily Al-Akhbar, was killed and Al-Manar TV reporter Ali Chouayb was wounded at around midday today when an Israeli tank fired into the village of Aadaisseh on Lebanon’s southern border (about 30 km east of the coastal town of Tyre).”

  2. Pingback: Beirut Spring: Jeffrey Feltman Sends Letter To The New York Times About Al-Akhbar

  3. Anonymous says:

    Thank you Princesse, I added the link.

  4. Angry Arab is not a source. He should be banned from entering Lebanon, and locked in Jail if he enter Lebanon.

    No single handed blog has ever damanged Lebanon as much as the owner of Angry Arab. He lies to make Lebanon look bad. Must be a transfer of knowledge and hate from his Palestinian parents.

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  7. free speech is for losers says:

    Yes Jester, I also think we should imprison, or fire tank shells at point blank rangeon, all journalists who do not retranscribe faithfully the neocons & zionists ideology.

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