Naharnet and 14th of March psychological associations

Medias in Lebanon are more divided than the actual politicians they defend because they have this possibility to just play with the written and do all sorts of verbal acrobatics just because they can fantasize at will about their projected demons. Check this out (Sorry cannot put the link because Naharnet’s website is really bad. The actual link for this article now leads you to another one):

Hundreds of opposition supporters rallied in downtown Beirut on Saturday to mark the first anniversary of the Hizbullah-led sit-in that has sent 2,700 people unemployed and forced closure of 75 restaurants and coffee shops.

What you just read is a typical psychological association made among the 14th of March supporters. The sentence seems heavy like this (could have been divided in two parts for example) but precisely because it translate the immediate reaction people have when they think of ‘the opposition’, ‘the tents’, etc. It is almost funny (like a kid trying to make a point). Of course, more importantly, you don’t lead about opposition going to the street without saying why they went into the street in the first place. That is not important for the writers. What’s important is to find things that demonize a contentious act that could otherwise be viewed as genuinely popular.

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4 Responses to Naharnet and 14th of March psychological associations

  1. Anonymous says:

    i think that media’s freedom in indulging in the production of highly biased reports feeds into the faceless-ness the politicians’ discourses acquire through what you are referring to as the word-acrobatics. in my view, the media serve in propagating abstract politicians, ones that can’t directly be attacked, or named, or prosecuted, or held accountable as individuals… i don’t know if i’m making any sense here but this seems to be one of the most important leverages the lebanese media have acquired in the way they are structured.

    besides the issue of bias you have emphasized in the quote, i think that it is important to address whether this sit-in has achieved anything at all… i personally don’t see how this sit-in has served the purpose of the opposition. i don’t see that it has advanced their political stance in any way… please correct me if i’m wrong…

  2. aounist says:

    demonize!?! no opposition in the world if it loves its country will cause 3000 employes to be fired and to bring the country on the verge of a civil war!

    what naharnet is doing is not supporting 14 march but is feeling with the people that work down there and who lost their jobs!do you seriously think if 14 march ddnt do the same thing(tents and burning wheels) naharnet wouldnt critisize them?!?!

  3. Anonymous says:

    an answer to ‘aounist’:
    regardless of whether naharnet would have criticized march 14th or not, their job is to present all the facts and not to remove things out of their context. it is from this perspective that they are biased and that they are demonizing the opposition. a media outlet’s responsiblity is to stick to objectivity in reporting any situation…
    also, naharnet is not supposed to be columnists’ playground but a mere listing of facts… i’m surprised you can’t see this incompetence in the lebanese media’s general approach in reporting news…

  4. Riemer Brouwer says:

    Yup, couldn’t agree more about the bias in news media. Take a look at Naharnet’s home page today. Ever since last week Wednesday, they have carried the story about Hezbollah saying no to a constitutional amendment, consistently including ‘…Raad said Wednesday’, suggesting it was said Wed Dec 5, while in fact it was said a week earlier.

    With the swift changes in positions, reporting 10 day old news as if it happened only 2 days ago is another example of that very old saying that truth is always the first victim in a conflict.

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